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April 2021

Online: Indigenous History

April 15 @ 6:00 pm - 7:00 pm
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April 15 @ 6:00 pm - 7:00 pm

Traditionally, spring has been the time of the Strawberry Festival, a Coast Miwok and Pomo celebration to honor the abundant late-April harvest of wood strawberries and other plants. During the festival, Miwok dancers carry the delicate fruit into a ceremonial building hung with wreaths of wildflowers. Spring was also the time for harvesting the bulbs and corms of grassland flowers in the lily family. Among them included Ithuriel’s spear, blue dick, wild onions, mariposa lilies, soap root, and the blue-flowered camas. 

Learn more about the Bay Area’s indigenous peoples at our upcoming event with naturalist Jerry Coe.  He’ll discuss the history of the Coast Miwok and Ohlone people, how they survived within the landscape, and common cultural practices. Jerry will also share how the thousands of Coast Miwok had their land usurped and were forced into missions by the Spaniards. The Miwok were almost wiped out within a century because of European diseases, slavery, and genocide perpetrated by incoming Europeans.  Others moved away. However,  Miwok people still live in the Bay Area today, with the largest group at Graton Rancheria in Sonoma County.

 

Date: Thursday, April 15th

Time: 6pm – 7pm

Location:  Zoom meeting (details emailed upon reservation)

 

REGISTER HERE

 

Space is limited; reservations required.

Free. (Donations are appreciated.) 

Questions? Contact programs@friendsofchinacamp.org or call (415) 456-0766.

Cancellations notified via email.

Illustration credit: Three Coast Miwok natives wearing various headbands and headdresses, by Louis Choris, 1816

Details

Date:
April 15
Time:
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm

Online: Spring Birding Seminar

April 16 @ 6:00 pm - 7:00 pm
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April 16 @ 6:00 pm - 7:00 pm

April is the beginning of nesting season for many Bay Area birds. The majority nest April through June, mostly due to the availability of regional food. A tip: if you ever are reincarnated, you may want to think twice about coming back as a female house finch; per season they can have up to 3-4 broods, with about 5 eggs per clutch. Phew! Think of the babysitting fees! These colorful seed-eating birds are easy to ID and are often found happily tweet-tweet-deedlee-deeting a beautiful and distinctive song. Males have a red head and breast with patchy brown verticle stripes; females are more muted in color so as to not attract predators when nesting. These and other birds work so hard to make nests to protect their babies, so please note that it is a federal offense to prune trees during nesting season which is April through August! 

 

Want more tips on how and where to spot these and other springtime birds? Join our upcoming beginning birding seminar, led by naturalist Jerry Coe. During our online event, Jerry will show you how to identify common birds in the field and how to use essential tools like binoculars and bird guides. You will also learn how to identify birds by observing flight patterns, noting body shapes and sizes, hearing songs, and watching behaviors.

 

Jerry Coe is a naturalist with over eight years of intensive training in ornithological field identification. He spent 15 years as a volunteer in Nevada’s Great Basin National Park, using bird activities to assess the health of habitats. Jerry has also guided outdoor expeditions all over the world.

 

Date: Friday, April 16

Time: 6pm – 7pm

Venue: Zoom meeting (details emailed once space is reserved) 

 

REGISTER HERE

 

Space is limited; reservations required. 

Free. Donations are appreciated.

Cancellations notified via email.

Questions? Email programs@friendsofchinacamp.org or call (415) 456-0766.

 Photo credit: House finch by © Martina Nordstrand; Macaulay Library

Details

Date:
April 16
Time:
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm

Online: Naturalist Book Club

April 25 @ 7:00 pm - 8:00 pm
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April 25 @ 7:00 pm - 8:00 pm

Join us as we discuss John and Mildred Teal’s Life and Death of the Salt Marsh. First published in 1969, this telling book highlights the natural history of the dynamic salt marshland biomes of the east coast and how this dwindling resource has been affected by human-caused development. This topic is especially relevant to our park: over the last century the San Franciso Bay lost over 90 percent of its wetlands, and our park protects the largest intact portion of the remaining habitat.  Friends of China Camp naturalist Harold Hirsch will lead our online group discussion about this fascinating topic.

 

Excerpt from Goodreads.com:

At low tide, the wind blowing across Spartina grass sounds like wind of the prairie. When the tide is in, the gentle music of moving water is added to the prairie rustle…. “

One of nature’s greatest gifts is the string of salt marshes that edges the East Coast from Newfoundland to Florida — a ribbon of green growth, part solid land, part scurrying water. Life and Death of the Salt Marsh shows how these marshes are developed, what kinds of life inhabit them, how enormously they have contributed to man, and how ruthlessly man is destroying them.

 

 

Date: Sunday, April 25

Time: 7pm – 8pm

Venue: Zoom meeting (details emailed once space is reserved).

 

REGISTER HERE

 

Space limited; reservations required.

Free. (Donations are appreciated.)

Questions? Contact programs@friendsofchinacamp.org or call (415) 456-0766.

Cancellations notified via email.

Details

Date:
April 25
Time:
7:00 pm - 8:00 pm
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